Picky Parrot Products II
© Picky Parrot Products II

The Story of Jeannie by Patti

Lemaire

Let me introduce myself and Jeannie, our wonderful miracle girl: I am Patti Lemaire and my love for parrots hit like a hurricane 40 years ago. This storm that overcame me was life changing in many ways. I could go on and on, but this is about Jeannie and not me. So here we go; I love baby African Greys and while I was living in Colorado I found an ad in the Bird Club Newsletter for baby Greys to wean out. My pair was not producing. I knew how to hand feed and had all the equipment necessary to handle this so I purchased Jeannie and her sister, Sweetie Pie. After raising them I could not let them go, so I kept them as my personal birdie kids. One day Jeannie announced that she was in love with Rocky, aka “Rocky Roonie,” a very dapper young man. They set up housekeeping and actually had a baby and I did not even know it. I had this nest box on top of a cage and the kids would all play in it. Thank goodness I checked out the box, because inside was the biggest baby Grey I had ever seen. I learned my lesson from that one, no more playing in nest boxes. No one was locked up and they could come out and go into their cages as they wished. Who would have thought this would happen and that I would not know about it? A few years later, I was feeding and doing a regular cage clean up and I noticed that Jeannie had an open sore on her chest. I did not have a clue how this happened, there was no blood, only a open wound the size of a quarter. This was the beginning of Picky Parrot Collars. Open wounds are difficult enough to treat and this one was a real challenge because round wounds cannot be sutured—there’s no skin to pull together. So I had to come up with something to keep her from picking the wound. We tried wash cloths with a neck hole, they were too stringy and if she chewed them could be very dangerous. I tried various materials and they were unsafe as well. I tried the plastic collars; the x-ray film collars, not good because of the lead content; neck plastic collars; which were inconvenient because if food got between the collar and neck you had to unscrew the collar, clean it and reattach it again—not an easy task. I worked with many fabrics and materials to make the collars as comfortable, flexible, soft and safe as possible. The plastic as interfacing did not work because it would melt or bubble if dried in dryer. I wanted the collar to be adjustable so it would be easy for each customer to trim it to the appropriate length and enlarge the neck if needed and I wanted it not to fray. The collar that was most needed would be able to be machine washed and dried. Air flow is very important to heal open wounds or allow feathers to grow. I had to be certain not to restrict this situation, nothing against the body. The material has to withstand chewing and not become a “stringed hazard” to the bird from chewing. I tried to put myself in the parrots’ feathers and see “what is wanted and needed.” With each collar I created, Jeannie was my little tester—and she would wear each and every one and without complaint. If there was a correction to be made, Jeannie would surely find it. This was an ongoing effort on her part for over seven years—we were a team working toward a goal to hopefully help other parrots in need of a collar. Jeannie had one other problem requiring a collar— her preening gland got impacted. So back with a collar, and this time it seemed like we were finally getting the collar the way it would work for all. She took a few months to heal and the collar was to come off the next morning. I promised her that the collar would come off and that I wanted to monitor her with it off during the day. I woke the next day very excited about removing the collar and found her passed away. Her journey was complete; she had come to do what she needed to do. She has left behind something very wonderful for the parrot world. If your parrot needs a collar—really needs a collar—thank our dear Jeannie for her contribution. She was the creator—I was just the messenger. Upon necropsy, we found that she had cancer, though it all she was devoted until the end.
ABOUT
Home Products Directions Pricing Gallery Contact About About
Picky Parrot Products II
© Picky Parrot Products II

The Story of Jeannie by Patti

Lemaire

Let me introduce myself and Jeannie, our wonderful miracle girl: I am Patti Lemaire and my love for parrots hit like a hurricane 40 years ago. This storm that overcame me was life changing in many ways. I could go on and on, but this is about Jeannie and not me. So here we go; I love baby African Greys and while I was living in Colorado I found an ad in the Bird Club Newsletter for baby Greys to wean out. My pair was not producing. I knew how to hand feed and had all the equipment necessary to handle this so I purchased Jeannie and her sister, Sweetie Pie. After raising them I could not let them go, so I kept them as my personal birdie kids. One day Jeannie announced that she was in love with Rocky, aka “Rocky Roonie,” a very dapper young man. They set up housekeeping and actually had a baby and I did not even know it. I had this nest box on top of a cage and the kids would all play in it. Thank goodness I checked out the box, because inside was the biggest baby Grey I had ever seen. I learned my lesson from that one, no more playing in nest boxes. No one was locked up and they could come out and go into their cages as they wished. Who would have thought this would happen and that I would not know about it? A few years later, I was feeding and doing a regular cage clean up and I noticed that Jeannie had an open sore on her chest. I did not have a clue how this happened, there was no blood, only a open wound the size of a quarter. This was the beginning of Picky Parrot Collars. Open wounds are difficult enough to treat and this one was a real challenge because round wounds cannot be sutured—there’s no skin to pull together. So I had to come up with something to keep her from picking the wound. We tried wash cloths with a neck hole, they were too stringy and if she chewed them could be very dangerous. I tried various materials and they were unsafe as well. I tried the plastic collars; the x-ray film collars, not good because of the lead content; neck plastic collars; which were inconvenient because if food got between the collar and neck you had to unscrew the collar, clean it and reattach it again—not an easy task. I worked with many fabrics and materials to make the collars as comfortable, flexible, soft and safe as possible. The plastic as interfacing did not work because it would melt or bubble if dried in dryer. I wanted the collar to be adjustable so it would be easy for each customer to trim it to the appropriate length and enlarge the neck if needed and I wanted it not to fray. The collar that was most needed would be able to be machine washed and dried. Air flow is very important to heal open wounds or allow feathers to grow. I had to be certain not to restrict this situation, nothing against the body. The material has to withstand chewing and not become a “stringed hazard” to the bird from chewing. I tried to put myself in the parrots’ feathers and see “what is wanted and needed.” With each collar I created, Jeannie was my little tester—and she would wear each and every one and without complaint. If there was a correction to be made, Jeannie would surely find it. This was an ongoing effort on her part for over seven years—we were a team working toward a goal to hopefully help other parrots in need of a collar. Jeannie had one other problem requiring a collar— her preening gland got impacted. So back with a collar, and this time it seemed like we were finally getting the collar the way it would work for all. She took a few months to heal and the collar was to come off the next morning. I promised her that the collar would come off and that I wanted to monitor her with it off during the day. I woke the next day very excited about removing the collar and found her passed away. Her journey was complete; she had come to do what she needed to do. She has left behind something very wonderful for the parrot world. If your parrot needs a collar—really needs a collar—thank our dear Jeannie for her contribution. She was the creator—I was just the messenger. Upon necropsy, we found that she had cancer, though it all she was devoted until the end.
ABOUT
Site Menu